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Research shows global gender pay gap rose by 3% in 2020

Why are men and women still not getting paid the same for doing the same job?

Allie Nawrat

Leader

gender pay gap
Credit: Daphee Marie via Twenty20.

This is not just an issue at the CEO level. Unleash Your Equity

  • Research by Movemeon and Payspective found that the gender pay gap grew in 2020.
  • In addition, pay inequity was found to be substantial at all levels of organizations, however, it was most pronounced at the director level.

The world is still yet to achieve gender equality and pay equity in the workplace.

Recent research by AP and Equilar found that female CEO pay dropped 1.9% over the past year, while male CEO packaged rose 5.2%.

However, a study by hiring platform Movemeon and its sister company Payspective has found that the gender pay gap is not only an issue at CEO level, it also exists across all levels of organizations.

Their ‘2021 Work and Pay’ report found that the gender pay gap in 2020 was 22%, compared to 19% in 2018, and 25% in 2018. Thereby suggesting that the gender pay gap is “persistent” and insufficient progress has been made.

Although Movemeon and Payspective’s research, which involved collecting 35,000 data points from 4,000 clients, noted that gendered pay inequity is substantial at all levels of seniority, it is particularly pronounced at director level where there is a 23% average difference between men and women’s salaries. The gap is 9% at associate level and 5% at manager level.

Movemeon and Payspective conclude that half of this gap at director level is due to bonuses with male directors receiving, on average, almost double the bonus of female directors.

Movemeon co-founder Nick Patterson commented: “In 2021 women earning 23% less than their male counterparts is simply staggering.

“With more transparency around pay, these hugely unfair inconsistencies can begin to be ironed out.  

The company’s other co-founder Richard Rosser added: “Undoubtedly, men and women should be paid equally to do the same job.

“Companies are reporting hiring challenges, and some have reported an exiting of senior female staff. Could the fact that women are being paid less to do the same job have something to do with this? Companies need to consult their data and then act upon the results closely. 

“Let’s make 2021 the year to fully recognize the economic benefit of gender-balanced workplaces and ensure we build a sustainable and inclusive economy.

[Read more: Why women’s journey to the top takes longer, according to YPO]

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